Ando’s World Cup Recap: England Would Have Been Sweeter!

Gary Anderson has been recounting his struggles to get ‘match fit’, and in the groove for doubles, before Scotland tremendous win in the 2019 World Cup of Darts.

This years event has been delayed by Covid-19 and will now take place between November 6-8th. In the meantime the PDC have released a special highlights program with some of the events stars recounting their memories.

Anderson said: “It’s the only time in the year I play pairs and I’ve said that to Peter. Back years ago in the BDO you always played pairs, triples, games like that, you were used to it.

“So once a year is bad enough. It’s hard to get into, hard to get into your throw. “When I came back to darts my main target was the Worlds and a floor tournament, that was the first step”

“I think I had played in one or two ProTours prior to the World Cup, I was struggling”.

“Once we got across there, you know what you’ve got to do.

“Unfortunately we never got to play Netherlands or England because that would have been even sweeter”.

“Even when we started that tournament we kicked off well, I felt we were on it here. It just clicked from there.

“William and Steve had played well the whole tournament. But it was just good to get back.

“It’s not just yourself you are playing for, it’s someone else as well. If you lose a game you’re a bit naff because you are putting all the pressure on your partner. It works both ways.

“It was long overdue. We had lost in two finals to the two teams you couldn’t get harder with the players. We finally did it.

“But Willie and Steve are a pair of good lads. You have a cracking laugh with Willie. 

“I reckon we’ve got a few good years left hopefully. To be 21 again in this day and age would be great. We can still show them the way.


Although the tournament has been moved back to be held from November 6-8, fans can look back on some classic games in the World Cup’s history in PDCTV and at the OfficialPDC YouTube Channel.


Pix: Taylor Lanning

Dobey & Dobey: Father Figures and A New Darting Double Act?

CHRIS DOBEY, is delighting in the role of dad, but it has reminded him of the efforts, and sacrifices, made by his own father. The northeast star wants to help his dad become an oche star as a thank you for putting him on the road to glory.

The Bedlington barnstormer is in the Scottish management team of Dunvegan Darts, owned by Tommy Gilmour MBE, and he’s gradually becoming a big hitter on the oche. But his biggest wish is to help dad Gordon – a long-time pal of Gary Anderson – finally get a chance at the big time.

Throughout the 1990s Dobey senior chose to support his young family in Northumberland as a foreman on a building site rather than go for darting success.

Now Chris wants to pay for his dad to enter Q School at the age of 57. He added: “I would love to see my dad give it a crack, even one go at Q School. I still believe that he could get a Tour Card. 

“He did so much and didn’t play as much so he could work and give us all a good upbringing. 

“If not this January, the one after, and we’ll see what he’s got.”

Dobey, 30, is now up to No.20 in the PDC Order of Merit after a cracking 2019 which included reaching the semi-finals at both the World Grand Prix and Players Championship Finals.

He said: “I was playing good stuff on the back end of last year. I made two major semis and had a decent run at the Worlds again. 

“I also had a good run at Minehead for the UK Open and obviously I was setting myself up for playing the Premier League at Newcastle, the same week everything just stopped. It was going to be a north-east derby with Glen Durrant.

Dobey and Durrant (The Double D’s) are scheduled to appear in Darts World ‘Player’s Lounge’ very soon!

But Hollywood’s career was given a huge boost prior to 2020:

“The one good run at the Grand Prix in Dublin when I reached the semi-final and then took that into the Players Championships and I reached another last four,

it’s all about confidence and experience.

“It’s actually going to be hard going back after lockdown. Obviously the virus needs to be cleared up beforehand. But it is nice to spend time with the family. I have been on a couple of long walks just to get a bit of fresh air and try and keep myself fit a little bit.

“To be honest it’s not as bad as what I thought it would be. It’s given me the kick up the backside to practice and that’s all I seem to be doing. That and just spending time with the little one.”

It seems that the Dobey’s enjoy more than just a love of darts. Two dedicated father figures could be about to become a unique double-act on the PDC tour


Pix: Taylor Lanning

Elusive Exclusive: Superchin Rested & Ready!

You could be forgiven for thinking that Daryl Gurney had vanished into thin air over recent weeks. Unlike many darts stars, Superchin has been barely visible recently. After poor facilities meant he missed the Home Tour and has hardly appeared in the media. Darts World’s reader contributor Elias Wilhelm was keen to track down the elusive two-time major winner:

DARYL GURNEY was a whisker away from the final of the World Matchplay last year, but he lost out after an incredible chase by Rob Cross. It was one of his most painful defeats. He wants to do better this year.


In a short conversation Elias the World Grand Prix Champion admits that he enjoyed the time-out a lot. He was able to “spend more time with his son after the three and a half years of non-stop playing”.


The Northern Irishman added that he hadn’t had a dart in his hand for a long time. It is only very recently that he started his preparations for the continuation of the Pro Tour, which begins with the Summer Series on July 8.


“To be honest, I enjoyed the time not playing. […] I didn’t
touch a dart for 12 weeks. I’ve just started playing again.”


Daryl did not participate in the Home Tour due to his bad internet. In addition, his set-up has been temporarily hanging on his father’s bathroom door. Laughing, he said that there would be problems if someone needed the bathroom.


In addition to the Summer Series, the World Matchplay will also take place in mid July. Whether spectators are admitted will only be announced at short notice. In this respect, ‘Superchin’ agrees completely with the decisions taken by the PDC.

He has no doubt about what Barry Hearn and Matthew Porter determine:


“I think, Barry [Hearn] and Matthew [Porter] know what They are doing.

I trust them.”


Although it will be hard for the Players Championship winner to “get used to strict conditions”, he said that he has no other choice if he wants to play again.

Above all, Daryl is looking forward to the World Matchplay, which will start on July 18. Last he lost to Rob Cross in the semifinals despite an interim 7-leg lead. Now he is more hungry than ever for the Phil Taylor-Trophy.

“Yes, I’m very hungry. Especially after what happened last
year.”

Despite this, he yearns most for winning the World Championships. He never made it there further than the quarterfinals. He often lost in the first rounds of the tournament. He’d give anything to call himself a world champion:

“I would swap everything I’ve won to be called World Champion. I yearn for it more than any other title.”


Daryl will try to return to ‘fitness’ upcoming in the Summer Series. Afterward, it will be very exciting to see if the Winmau thrower can do better at the World Matchplay than last year if he can count himself among the glorious winners of the Phil Taylor Trophy.


Pix: Taylor Lanning.

Exclusive: Bunting Wants Double Celebration.

STEPHEN BUNTING is hoping for a double celebration of Liverpool winning the Premier League and then qualifying for the World Matchplay. The 2014 BDO World Champion admits he is buzzing that sport is back on the big stage with his beloved Reds on the verge of title success.

‘The Bullet’ will bid to grab his place in the Matchplay with five crucial Players Championships events in Milton Keynes from July 8. He said:

“I watched the football on Wednesday but it’s a bit weird without the fans and no atmosphere.

But obviously, when Liverpool are on I’ll be glued to the telly”.

“Watching the derby with Everton 7pm kick-off on Sunday is going to be strange in itself. I still think we’ll win the game then hopefully we can wrap up the title on Wednesday against Palace.

“Being at home has been so boring with no darts and also no football. It’s crazy. Me as a fan I look forward to games so much. You learn to appreciate sport so much.”

Bunting will need to hit the ground running for the Summer Series and reach the Matchplay on July 18.

The Bullet is currently World No.17 and will miss out on qualification unless he can outgun his nearest Order of Merit challengers in Milton Keynes. He also admits it will be a weird scenario at the Marshalls Arena, unlike any other ProTour event held before.

For diabetic players such as himself, Ian White, Andy Hamilton and Jamie Caven, the return to action poses extra problems.

He added: “The way it has worked out for me it makes it very difficult. Obviously I’ve just got to get to Milton Keynes and forget about everything and go and play.

“I’m 17 in the rankings. There’s also a possibility that not all the top 16 seeded players are going to come over for it, you just don’t know what’s going to happen. I can never count my chickens.

“Obviously I’ll be trying my hardest in Milton Keynes to earn that spot. I think I’m about £3,000 behind on the ProTour Order of Merit.

“If I can have a good five days in Milton Keynes then I can make it to Blackpool in my own right.

“It’s going to be a weird situation as well. We don’t know what’s happening or what the new protocols are. 

“A big thing for me is travelling as well. Obviously I’ve got Type-2 diabetes so I’ve still got to be very careful. Getting to the venue is important and once you are there it’s OK.”

Bunting also reveals that he has made a huge decision to change his diet and lifestyle with so much information regarding Covid-19 affecting the vulnerable in society, which includes diabetes sufferers.

He added:

“My wife has bought me an exercise bike and I’ve been on that every day. I’ve changed my diet and I’m trying to do things away from the oche to make myself fitter”.

“A few family members have lost loads of weight in the past and are no longer diabetic so that’s something I can try and do. It’s going to benefit me in the long run with having more energy”.

“We’re on a healthy meal club and we get set 12 meals for a week sent to you. It’s perfect and I’m enjoying that and getting used to the exercise regime. 

“I’m taking it slowly, not trying to be Superman right away.

Just building up the amounts I do so I don’t burn myself out!

“I’ve also tried to change my lifestyle by not staying up so late at night on the PlayStation. I’m going to bed earlier and waking up fresher with more energy.”.


Pix: Taylor Lanning

Bunting’s Back! Bullet Gunning for Matchplay Spot!

The Bullet is currently World No.17 and will miss out on qualification unless he can outgun his nearest Order of Merit challengers in Milton Keynes. He also admits it will be a weird scenario at the Marshalls Arena, unlike any other ProTour event held before.

“I’m 17 in the rankings. There’s also a possibility that not all the top 16 seeded players are going to come over for it,

you just don’t know what’s going to happen. I can never count my chickens.

“Obviously I’ll be trying my hardest in Milton Keynes to earn that spot. I think I’m about £3,000 behind on the ProTour Order of Merit. “If I can have a good five days in Milton Keynes then I can make it to Blackpool in my own right”.

Dependant on the government statement, due at the start of July, there are multiple ways for the Liverpool ace to make it into the final thirty-two. Over the five day of the Summer Series he could play his way into an automatic place. Failing that other players may opt or be prevented from attending.

But BUnting is intent on overcoming the many challenges he faces in order to compete on the biggest stages once again.

He added:

“IF I CAN HAVE A GOOD FIVE DAYS IN MILTON KEYNES THEN I CAN MAKE IT TO BLACKPOOL IN MY OWN RIGHT.

Perhaps Stephen, a passionate LFC fan, will be inspired by Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool side, who return to action on Sunday!


Read the full conversation later today on dartsworld.com

Exclusive: Thank Evans For “Mad Ricky”.

RAPID Ricky Evans admits he’ll always be a bit “mad” as he aims to finally shake off the oche joker tag with major titles. The Kettering ace is never short on laughs as arguably the wackiest star of the oche and has spent lockdown dressed as a cheerleader and in a blue morph costume on social media.

As per usual with the World No.29 it has been a wacky few months as he’s got kitted up for the Clap For Carers every Thursday night. Evans, 29, said:

“My dad and I have done three Clap For Carers dressing up nights. He collects masks and anyone who knows us knows I am just my dad 30 or 40 years ago. He’s nuts. “He’s got at least 100 masks. He’ll go on ebay and see a Donald Trump mask and buy it. He’ll buy any old rubber latex mask. 

“On one Thursday night, I was in a blue morph suit, wearing a PDC shirt on an exercise bike. I’ve been a cheerleader so far as well.” “My dance I did at the Ally Pally in December has been watched a few times and turned into a GIF. I still don’t know what happened then.”

Evans – who threw a 180 in 2.16 seconds in the Worlds three years ago – also also feared he’d be too quick for his own WiFi in the PDC Home Tour.

He added: “My board is in a little darts room that my mum and dad made for me when I was a teenager. I had to tell my mum and dad to stay off WiFi after 6.30 pm.

“Because I’m a quick player it was hard. Usually, I’m always on my tiptoes ready to throw against my opponent. It was weird having no one in front of me. It slowed me down a bit and certainly upset my rhythm.

“The biggest problem was that my phone camera wasn’t able to keep up with my throw, my throw is too quick for WiFi to trust me.

“I was looking forward to all the tournaments and trying to qualify for the big TV events. I’m usually away for 40 weeks a year, I was in 2019 and that was very successful for me.

“I had hit form for a few months just before the lockdown. Now it’s a weird one whether to practice hard or not.“Last year was awesome for me, I qualified for everything apart from the Grand Slam. I was a seed for the Europeans which was great.

“I ran into Michael (van Gerwen) in the Worlds. It wasn’t a 4-0 defeat game, I missed some big chances. But that’s why he’s World No.1 and I’m World No.29.”

Evans also admits that he’s unlikely to stop being the oche madman – unless he starts winning majors. He said: “I’m just me and that might not change ever. I’m serious on the oche. I’m never going to be the most serious player in the world. If I started making semi-finals and finals that jovial stuff would wear off a bit I’m sure. “I think people would get bored of my silly walk-ons and facial expressions. Maybe I could wear a mask!

“Until then I won’t change, I’ll always be a bit mad.”


Young Guns Forcing Generational Change? Or The Old Guard Failing To Keep Up?

Darts World lets our readers have their voice heard and, it’s fair to say, our reader *Elias Wilhelm has gone from gentle homage to the Winter Gardens, to a full blast at some of our senior Pro’s:

In recent years, many young players, such as Aspinall, Dobey or De Zwaan, have attracted a lot of attention. Slowly, but surely they supplant themselves into the world’s elite. Slightly older players just can’t seem to keep up.

The Asp, Nathan Aspinall, has been amongst a group of younger players nipping at the heels of those who have been at the top for many years.(pic: Taylor Lanning)

How can it be that these are being harassed by young players from their place at the top of the world? Terry Jenkins, Ronnie Baxter, Mervyn King, Kevin Painter, Andy Hamilton, Robert Thorton. These were all players who have played in the Premier League in the last ten years. Now some have almost completely disappeared, while some have to fight to keep their spot on the tour.

Raymond van Barneveld ended his career simply because he no longer had the ability to win. He was in pain. It was too hard for him to endure, to go to tournaments, and hardly ever to win.

In addition, many trips were a problem for him. His departure was then at the end of last year full of disgrace. That’s exactly how many older players feel. The whole trips back and forth is much too exhausting. The tournament calendar is getting more and more crowded.

RVB’s career petered out over the last few years (PIC;LAWRENCE LUSTIG).

The tournaments are indispensable for them because otherwise, they would drop in the rankings. That’s why they have no choice if they want to stay successful, they have to play and play and play. On top of that, strong young players join in. Especially the players, like Nathan Aspinall, who are almost unstoppable. Full of energy, they’re pushing up the rankings. Also players, like Humphries or Van Den Bergh, who beat big players every now and then and score good results.


All this makes it difficult for the older players, which is why it is no wonder that they are slowly being ousted from the world elite. Experience no longer plays such a big role and young players have a lot of self-confidence and no respect for,(or perhaps, fear of) the older players.

Everbronze? The Adonis does not conform to the conventions in any way!

Many are happy when players like Steve Beaton or Mervyn King can still keep up. But it is obvious that time is running out for the veterans.


Elias Wilhelm (@ewh27) is a Darts World reader and budding darts writer who appears to be getting the hang of our ‘Talking Points’!

*Reader’s writes is Darts World’s area for our reader’s voices to be heard. Their views are their own and do not represent the opinions of the magazine or its staff.

Aspinall To ‘Open’ Darts World’s ‘Player’s Lounge’. Live from 7.30pm Tonight.

Former UK Open Champion Nathan Aspinall will be our first ‘Players Lounge’ guest, tonight at 7.30 pm. ‘The Asp’ with be chatting with Darts World’s Tom Beresford over on our facebook page. The popular Stockport player will be talking all things darts, and maybe having a bit of fun.

The Asp is a thoughtful, but fun, guy.

Fresh from his recent Home Tour success ‘The Asp’ is focused on the upcoming Betfred World Matchplay and hoping to climb the ranking over the next year or so. Nathan is a down to earth level headed guy, who not so long ago could barely afford a new dartboard.

It seems he has not forgotten his earlier tour struggles and he has spoken out about the difficulty facing those ranked outside the top sections of professional darts and the difficulties that lie ahead with regard to ranking tables and the restart of the PDC tours.

All-in-all, he is the ideal guest to open Darts Worlds new ‘Players Lounge’ and we hope you enjoy the first of many ‘Facebook Live’ events.


Pix: Taylor Lanning

Ochepedia (and Coach): When The Cyclone Hit Barnsley!

The Cyclone, Mickey Mansell to his friends, is one of the nicest people on the darts circuit and has had many an impressive moment on the Pro Tour. But why did he suddenly blow so hard after such a calm spell?

Darts News - ‪MICKEY MANSELL WINS HIS FIRST EVER PDC... | Facebook‬

One of the best things about having the services of, ‘Darts’ Official Statistician’, Christopher Kempf is that it allows Darts World to combine his unsurpassed numerical knowledge with the Darts World teams long-standing knowledge of many of the game’s other elements.

Here, Ochepedia, as Christopher is known, looks at the numbers behind Michael’s superb and, for many, unexpected return to the darting limelight. Our ‘Coach’ has known and watched Mickey for almost a decade and provides the ‘behind the numbers‘ comments:

Ochepedia – Even today, it seems so unlikely that Mickey Mansell could have won Players Championship 8, blasting his way through a talented field of World Champions and top-16 players to claim his first PDC title. After all, this is the same Mickey Mansell who has not even made a quarterfinal for the better part of four years. The £10,000 earned by the Northern Irishman in his debut win, while all but securing a tour card for the 2019 season, does not even put Mansell into the top 64 in the world. 

(CoachMickey is a superbly talented player, he combines precision with a very patient, calm, and unruffled style. Not much on the board unsettles him and he uses very little energy during his matches.)

How, then, do we account for the fact that Mansell dispatched his opposition by a combined score of 42-11, never allowing any opponent to throw match darts? How does a player so unheralded make such quick work of four Premier League alumni? 

The answer is consistency. Of those 42 legs won by the Clonoe Cyclone, 39 were finished in 18 darts or less. Almost irrespective of his foes’ output, Mansell’s average remained in the mid-90s for leg after leg as the man from County Tyrone dished out 15 and 17 darters, hour after hour. Moreover, if his record of 19 checkouts in 24 attempts (79%) in which he had 3 darts at a double placed him at the level of the world’s top players, his achievement of 23 2-dart checkouts (3-39 odd, 41-98, 100) in 35 attempts placed him well above it. 

Mickey Mansell
Many forget that Mickey is hugely experienced.

(Coach: Michael has played almost everyone on the tour over his nine or so years in the PDC. They all know he can play at a very high level and he has defeated most if not all of them before. However, they were, perhaps, used the sub-par Cyclone that has been blowing somewhat weakly for a couple of years before. This event saw Mickey play as he used to.)

All of the exciting and statistically notable features of darts – the 180s, the high checkouts, the 11- and 12-dart legs – are entirely superfluous to a player who plays with such consistency. And in fact, Mansell had zero finishes of 101 or greater, resulting from 30 attempts; only 3 legs in the tournament won in four visits to the board, and a mere 11 180s scored in 53 legs. Perhaps a few stylish visits would have boosted his average or given the commentators something to laud, but one cannot win by a larger margin than a 6-0 whitewash, and Mansell had three of those on Sunday. What need had he to run up the score even further?

(Coach: Once Michael gets moving, and settled he can be very difficult to stop, it takes someone who can outscore him for a long spell and knock him out of his ‘zone’. That day no one managed both!)

Mickey Mansell’s triumph may be the clearest indication yet seen of the effectiveness of 140s in winning legs. The second treble hit in a visit to the board (yielding a 140) gives the biggest boost, in terms of number of darts needed to reach a finish, a double, or win the leg, to a player’s fortunes. The third treble is, of course, always welcome, but the extra benefit tends to be wasted in a leg that the player will win anyway if he hits a 140.

Even 100s, which Mansell also recorded at a prodigious rate, when backed up by solid combination finishing, put just enough pressure on opponents by limiting the number and increasing the difficulty of finishes they can attempt. With 52 100s and 52 140s in 53 legs – very nearly one of each per leg – Mansell wrung every last bit of effectiveness out of each treble scored.  Rarely does a player record an average of nearly 107 with his first 9 darts of the leg whilst hitting so few 180s, as Mansell did on Sundays – but if so few 180s resulted in a leg difference of +31 for the day, they were not missed.

(Coach: Now this makes real sense, I have always advocated for the ‘two out of three’ type of approach. It suits Mansell as he is not a show pony who hits 180s in bunches.)

If you like your darts fast and furious, replete with 110+ averages and 170 checkouts, Mickey Mansell may not be the player for you. In that respect, normal service will resume on the PDC circuit once Michael van Gerwen and Rob Cross return for the Premier League and for the German Darts Open. But the fact that Mansell is not the best player in the world is perhaps even more a testament to his achievement in Barnsley this past Sunday. The world number 66 managed to win a tournament by the widest possible margin with a minimum of effort – a feat almost without precedent in the current era of professional darts.

(Coach: Those of us who know Mickey and witnessed his efforts on the Pro-Tour, and during the very first Q-School, are seldom surprised by anything he achieves. His patience and resilience are exemplary and it is always pleasing to see him rewarded!)


  • Intro: DW Editorial Team
  • Italics: Coach.
  • Pix: PDC